Quick Answer: Is You Was A Correct Grammar?

Can I use was with you?

Generally, “was is used for singular objects and “were” is used for plural objects.

So, you will use “was” with I, he, she and it while you will use “were” with you, we and they.

Even though you are singular, you must use “were”.

“You was” is an incorrect usage..

Is you all correct grammar?

In most contexts “all of you” would be considered the correct phrasing. Some listeners or readers perceive “you-all” to be incorrect. Both are technically correct, but the second (“you all”) is less preferable because of the ambiguity of whether you mean y’all * or simply you all.

What is correct sentence?

In order for a sentence to be grammatically correct, the subject and verb must both be singular or plural. In other words, the subject and verb must agree with one another in their tense. If the subject is in plural form, the verb should also be in plur al form (and vice versa).

Can I say y all?

While “y’all” is actually a contraction for “you all” and is therefore technically correct, it is most commonly used in place of the plural form of “you.” The apostrophe after the “y” represents the lost “ooo” sound from the letters O and U. This explains why the sometimes-seen “ya’ll” spelling is wrong.

Can I say if I were?

Many people use if I was and if I were interchangeably to describe a hypothetical situation. The confusion occurs because when writing in the past tense, I was is correct while I were is incorrect. However, when writing about non-realistic or hypothetical situations, if I were is the only correct choice.

Is it correct to say I wish I were there?

I wish I were there. I wish I was there. Both are grammatically correct because in modern English, the only thing needed to express a counterfactual situation is a past tense verb.

How do you use grammar correctly?

Key RulesUse Active Voice. … Link Ideas with a Conjunction. … Use a Comma to Connect Two Ideas As One. … Use a Serial Comma in a List. … Use the Semicolon to Join Two Ideas. … Use the Simple Present Tense for Habitual Actions. … Use the Present Progressive Tense for Current Action. … Add “ed” to verbs for the Past Tense.

What was you doing correct?

Shouldn’t it be “what is you doing” if the rule is to use “is” for singular things. I have always used “What are you doing”, but a basic grammar rule is that for plural things you use “are” and for singular you use “is”. But when you say something like “What are you doing?”, you are talking to a singular person.

How do you check a sentence is correct or wrong?

Based on the context of complete sentences, Ginger Grammar Checker uses patent-pending technology to correct grammar mistakes, spelling mistakes and misused words, with unmatched accuracy. Ginger’s grammar check software improves your text just like a human reviewer would.

How can you tell if a sentence is grammatically correct?

Enter the text that you want to check for grammar, spelling, and punctuation mistakes; then click the gray button below. Click on underlined words to get a list of proper wording alternatives, suggestions, and explanations.

Can we say I were?

“I were” is subjunctive only; if you want to talk about the past, it’s “I was.” But if you wish you were, it’s “I wish I were.”

Why do people say you were instead of you?

It just looks exactly like the plural form. The same goes for “were” in the past tense, or for any other verb in second person: The form of the singular is identical to that of the plural. The other answer is that “you” is always plural. … Since ye/you were plural, they always took a plural verb.

Can we say you was?

“You were” is proper standard English. “You was” exists is some versions of non-standard English which tries to make the verb “to be” a regular verb with one past tense word for first, second, third, singular and plural. … Not wrong it its context, but not standard English either.

Which is correct grammatically correct if I was or if I were?

“I were” is called the subjunctive mood, and is used when you’re are talking about something that isn’t true or when you wish something was true. If she was feeling sick… <-- It is possible or probable that she was feeling sick. "I was" is for things that could have happened in the past or now.

Who were you or who you?

“You were” , is correct. As I said above, was and were are in the past tense, but they are used differently. Was is used in the first person singular (I) and the third person singular (he, she, it). Were is used in the second person singular and plural (you, your, yours) and first and third person plural (we, they).

Is yall a real word?

Y’all is actually never correct – especially in written English. Above, several people have noted there is an absent second-person plural pronoun in English. … Y’all is a stand-in for words that people generally feel are uncomfortable to say or they lack other words in their lexicon to get the meaning across.

Is yall proper?

This familiar pronoun is included in the Merriam-Webster dictionary, a trusted, go-to source for Southern Living copy editors. The only right way to spell the contraction of “you” and “all” is “y’all.” “Ya’ll” is incorrect and a misspelling of the word, so don’t use it.